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FAQ / LINKS

Q:What should my pet weigh?

A:The ideal weight for your pet is based on a body 
condition not a specific number.  We use a 1-5 scale for
evaluating your pets condition.  3/5 is the ideal body condition.
Once the ideal body condition is reached then the dogs 
corresponding weight is the appropriate number.  To evaluate 
this there are some key areas to observe.  The ribs should be 
easily felt while running your hand along your pets side, an obvious
waist should be noted, and underneath your pet should slope from 
the chest upwards towards the back end.


Q:What should I feed my pet?

A:Nutrition is by far the most important aspect of our pets health that is under our direct control.  We carry the Hills line of pet food (Prescription diet and Science Diet)  because we have seen consistent results and good company response to consumer concerns.  This is not to say they are the only good company out there.  There are an amazing assortment of dietary options for your pet.  Without going through an entire course of nutrition here are the top 5 items to look for to signify a quality pet food.




1)  Food should state "Complete and Balanced"
2)  AAFCO approved via feeding trials
3)  Digestibility >80%
4)  Reputation and history of company
5)  Pet Does Well on it.





Q:  How much food should I be feeding my dog?

A:  Many people think this is a very simple question.  However, the calorie requirements for your pet are dependent on many factors including:  breed, sex, age, intact/neuter, general health, activity, pregnant/nursing, etc.  Then the calorie content of your particular food choice must be taken into account to determine the volume of food fed.  Most quality pet food companies will have an estimated volume chart on the food.  A general rule to follow is give the low end of the estimated volume minus about 10%.  For more accurate volume calculations come in and see one of our veterinarians.

Q:  What Heartworm Preventative do you recommend?

A:  We recommend all pets be treated with a heartworm preventative regardless if they are indoors only or not.  We now recommend Sentinel or  Trifexis for dogs and Revolution for cats.   We have been using these products for years and have seen great results with minimal side effects.  For more information on heartworm disease visit our Preventative Medicine section.

Q:  What Flea & Tick Preventatives do you recommend?

A:  There are many external parasite protection products that are highly effective.  Unfortunately there are an equivalent amount of products that are not effective.  We currently are recommending either NexGard or  Parastar Plus for external parasite protection.  Parastar Plus is a topical product that kills fleas, ticks and lice for up to a month.  Not only does Parastar Plus kill ticks faster than most other products it also repels ticks.  NexGard is the first ever oral product that kills fleas and ticks for up to a month.  Which product you choose is dependent on which external parasites you are concerned about, patients general health status, method of administration, and the cost.

Q:  How do I know if my pet has worms?

A:  Intestinal parasites (a.k.a. worms) are a very common problem in our domestic pets.  There are thousands of parasites that can infect your pet.  Many of them are zoonotic or contagious to people and other pets.  The most common signs of intestinal parasites is diarrhea, vomiting, weight loss, distended abdomen, lethargy, etc.  These signs can be mild to severe and numerous other signs may present as well.  We use the fecal centrifugation detection method recommended by the CAPC (Companion Animal Parasite Council) which is the most accurate screening method available for intestinal parasite detection.  Once your pet is diagnosed with an intestinal parasite, appropriate deworming and preventative medications can be prescribed.  For more information on intestinal parasite screening please visit our Preventative Medicine section.

 Q:What is Manage?

A:Mange is a skin disease caused by the infestation of parasites called mites.  There are a number of different kinds of mites.  The two most common are Demodex and Sarcoptes.   Here are some pictures of one of our patients before and after his treatments for Demodectic Manage.















LINKS

www.veterinarypartner.com - VeterinaryPartner.com is here to support your veterinarian and you in the care of companion animals by providing reliable, up-to-date animal health information from the veterinarians and experts of the Veterinary Information Network, the world's first   and largest online veterinary database and community.

www.aphis.usda.gov - United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service website will provide any information you may need for traveling overseas with your pet.

www.animalcontrol.cobbcountyga.gov -   The mission of the Cobb County Animal Control Unit is to enforce the state laws and county ordinances pertaining to animal control and management; educate the community in responsible pet ownership and wildlife care; and provide for the housing and care of homeless animals and coordinate their adoption when possible and their humane euthanization when adoption is not possible.

www.cdc.gov -  The Center for Disease Control is collaborating to create the expertise, information, and tools that people and communities need to protect their health - through health promotion, prevention of disease, injury and disability, and preparedness for new health threats.

www.GVMA.net -  The Georgia Veterinary Medical Association is committed to advancing the veterinary medical profession and supporting the veterinarian's role in improving animal and public health.

www.petinsurance.com -  Veterinary Pet Insurance (VPI) offers the highest value, lowest cost dog insurance, cat insurance and bird and exotic pet insurance policies, all delivered with a customer-first philosophy.

www.heartwormsociety.org - The Heartworm Society tries to lead the veterinary profession and the public in the understanding of heartworm disease.



 
 


East Cobb Veterinary Clinic
1314 East Cobb Drive          Marietta, GA 30068
(770) 973-2286